The Ferry Game
Julie Skorepova avatar
Written by Julie Skorepova
Updated over a week ago

In this article you will find the following topics:

  • Introduction;

  • Scoring and implications;

  • Interview Guide;

  • Task during the game;

  • Validation report.

Introduction

The Ferry Game measures a person's problem-solving ability and problem-solving style, i.e. are they good at solving problems and how do they approach them.

Scoring and implications

The game's scoring algorithm is based on percentile scoring. People are scored on both problem-solving ability and problem-solving style. Players can score in each of the following 5 buckets for problem-solving ability:

  1. Low;

  2. Lower average;

  3. Average;

  4. Higher average;

  5. High.

To clarify the implications of different scores on this spectrum, below you'll find a comparison between bucket 1 (low ability) and bucket 5 (high ability)

Bucket 1. Low ability

Bucket 5. High ability

Characteristics and behaviours

You find it hard to correctly analyse information in order to identify a problem, and to plan the steps you need to take in order to solve this problem.

  • Difficulty breaking a problem into manageable components and solving them efficiently;

  • Lower productivity;

  • Less capable of prioritizing important steps in a task;

  • May be good at tasks that require instant responses and instinct, such as tasks involving human interaction.

  • May feel overwhelmed when asked to mentally plan tasks before executing.

  • Struggle with correctly analysing the information and generating various alternatives.

You find it easy to correctly analyse information in order to identify a problem, and to plan the steps you need to take in order to solve this problem.

  • Good at identifying problems and implementing the right strategies for solving them;

  • Can choose the necessary actions to achieve a goal;

  • Can plan the sequence of their actions in advance;

  • Can assign suitable resources for different tasks;

  • Good at estimating the total time and effort needed for solving certain problems;

  • Can consider all the possible alternatives to choose the best options;

  • May find environments in which you are not frequently challenged to use these skills boring or less interesting and may lose motivation for their tasks.


Responsibilities or environments that fit this person best

Tasks that require you to follow a routine.

Tasks for which you regularly deal with complex problems and tasks that require strategic decision-making.

Players can score in each of the following 5 buckets for problem-solving style:

  1. Very intuitive;

  2. Somewhat intuitive;

  3. Neutral;

  4. Somewhat systematic;

  5. Very systematic.

To clarify the implications of different scores on this spectrum, below you'll find a comparison between bucket 1 (very intuitive) and bucket 5 (very systematic

Bucket 1. Intuitive

Bucket 5. Systematic

Characteristics and behaviours

You solve a problem by trusting your instinct/gut feeling and by applying a trial-and-error approach. As a result, you quickly start/get into the problem-solving process.

  • Believe in your instincts rather than rational thinking before you make your move;

  • At ease with making intuitive decisions, rather than analysing a problem first;

  • Good at solving ill-structured problems by linking pieces of verbal or nonverbal information;

  • Open to quickly switching to alternative solutions when things do not work out;

  • May face difficulty whenever you need to solve problems efficiently since you not only include factual factors but also your gut feelings;

  • Your trial-and-error approach might consume more time overall when solving a complex problem.

You solve a problem through logical reasoning and carefully analyzing all information. This will take you a bit longer.

  • Likely to approach your problems with deliberate thinking, logical methodology, and reflection;

  • May attempt to follow an underlying rule for problems and solve them accordingly;

  • Likely to analyze the whole problem before making a move to solve it;

  • Have a tendency to evaluate your problem-solving process and the consequences to adjust your future behaviour accordingly;

  • May struggle with ill-defined problems or those without a structure, which may not benefit from planning;

  • May face difficulties with time constraints or intuitive decision making to solve problems.

Responsibilities or environments that fit this person best

More operational roles in which you often need to deal with ill-defined problems that lack a lot of info, and need to be solved quickly.

More strategic roles in which you have more time to carefully analyse and solve a problem, and in which you have (almost) all relevant info you need.

Interview Guide

Click here to access the Interview Guide, providing you with interview questions to include in your structured interviews, related to this game.

Task during the game

In this puzzle game, your goal is to get all characters from one side of the river to the other side. Some characters cannot cross the river at the same time. You need to find a strategy to cross the river and make sure that all characters will make it to the other side.
You will play 6 levels. Each level has slightly different rules. The time you spend on a level is measured, but there is no time limit. A skip button will appear after some time. You can click this button if you want to skip a level and move to the next one.

Validation report

Here you can find the validation report.

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